Disease/Syndrome

Contact dermatitis, allergic

Category

Skin Disease

Acute/Chronic

Subacute

Synonyms

Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD); Type IV delayed hypersensitivity; Cell-mediated hypersensitivity;

Biomedical References

Search PubMed

Comments

Patch testing can be useful in distinguishing between allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. The distinction is important because patients with allergic contact dermatitis may not be able to return to their jobs, e.g., a tile layer who is allergic to chromates in cement. The concentration of the allergens used in patch testing is important because concentrations that are too high will cause false positives due to an irritant effect. [Rom, p. 625-6] "Allergic contact dermatitis from acrylic resins typically affects the fingertips." [Kanerva, p. 543] Most cases of work-related dermatitis are caused by irritants. For healthcare workers the major irritants are water, antiseptic soaps, and sweat from glove occlusion. [Kanerva, p. 969] See "Contact dermatitis, irritant."

Latency/Incubation

At least 4 days to become sensitized; May take years; [LaDou, p. 332] Once sensitized, the allergic contact dermatitis often begins 24-48 hours after exposure and may take 2 weeks to resolve. [Rosenstock, p. 707]

Diagnostic

Patch testing

ICD-9 Code

692.89

Reference Link

CCOHS - Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Related Information in Haz-Map
Symptoms/Findings

Symptoms/Findings associated with this disease:

Job Tasks

High risk job tasks associated with this disease:

Agents

Hazardous agents that cause the occupational disease: