Agent Name

4,4'-Methylenedianiline

Alternative Name

MDA

CAS Number

101-77-9

Formula

C13-H14-N2

Major Category

Nitrogen Compounds

Synonyms

4,4'-Methylenedianiline; 4,4'-Diaminodiphenylmethan [German]; 4,4'-Diaminodiphenylmethane; 4,4'-Dimethylenediamine; 4,4'-Diphenylmethanediamine; 4,4'-Methylenebis(benzeneamine); 4,4'-Methylenebisaniline; 4,4'-Methylenedianiline; 4-(4-Aminobenzyl)aniline; Ancamine TL; Aniline, 4,4'-methylenedi-; Araldite hardener 972; Avaldite HT 972; Benzenamine, 4,4'-methylenebis-; Bis(4-aminophenyl)methane; Bis(p-aminophenyl)methane; Bis-p-aminofenylmethan [Czech]; Curithane; Dadpm; Di-(4-aminophenyl)methane; Diaminodiphenylmethane; Dianilinemethane; Dianilinomethane; Epicure DDM; Epikure DDM; HT 972; Jeffamine AP-20; MDA; Methylenebis(aniline); Methylenedianiline; Methylenedianiline (VAN); Sumicure M; Tonox; p,p'-Diaminodifenylmethan [Czech]; p,p'-Diaminodiphenylmethane; p,p'-Methylenedianiline; p-Toluidine, alpha-(p-aminophenyl)-; [ChemIDplus] UN2651

Category

Amines, Polyaromatic

Description

Pale-brown, crystalline solid with a faint, amine-like odor; [NIOSH]

Sources/Uses

Used as a chemical intermediate, lab analytic agent, and monomer for polyamide and polymide resins; [HSDB] Used primarily in the manufacture of rubber and plastics; used as an epoxy resin hardener in the following applications: glues, paints, inks, polyvinylchloride products, dental bonding agents, and microelectronic encapsulations; [Marks, p. 269]

Comments

Has caused liver injury after occupational exposure; "Some of the most commonly used curing agents in the advanced composite industry are the aromatic amines. Two of the most common are 4,4'-methylene-dianiline (MDA) and 4,4'-sulfonyldianiline (DDS). Like the epoxies, these compounds have a very low vapor pressure and usually do not present an airborne hazard unless in a mixture that is sprayed or cured at high temperatures. However, potential for dermal exposure is frequently high. The aromatic amines may permeate many of the commonly used protective gloves and thus may be particularly difficult to protect against." [OSHA Technical Manual: Advanced Composites] A rare cause of occupational allergic contact dermatitis; [Marks, p. 268-70] Merck Index #2980; A potential skin sensitizer and liver toxicant; [ICSC]

Restricted

Carcinogen--See 29 CFR 1910.1050

Reference Link

ATSDR - ToxFAQs - MDA

Exposure Assessment
Skin Designation (ACGIH)

Yes

TLV (ACGIH)

0.1 ppm

PEL (OSHA)

0.01 ppm, STEL(OSHA) = 0.1 ppm

Vapor Pressure

2.0E-7 mm Hg

Explanatory Notes

Flash point = 220 deg C;

Half Life

Plasma: 13 hours; urine: 7 hours; [TDR, p. 872]

Reference Link

Occupational dermatitis from exposure to polyurethane chemicals

Flammability (NFPA)

1: Must be preheated

Adverse Effects
Skin Sensitizer

Yes

Hepatotoxin

Hepatotoxin, Primary

IARC Carcinogen

Possible Carcinogen

NTP Carcinogen

Anticipated Human Carcinogen

ACGIH Carcinogen

Confirmed Animal

Links to Other NLM Databases
Health Studies

Human Health Effects from Hazardous Substances Data Bank:

Toxicity Information

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Chemical Information

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Biomedical References

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Related Information in HazMap
Diseases

Occupational diseases associated with exposure to this agent:

Processes

Industrial Processes with risk of exposure: