Disease/Syndrome

Contact dermatitis, photoirritant

Category

Skin Disease

Acute/Chronic

Subacute

Synonyms

PICD

Biomedical References

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Comments

After permeation into the skin, a few chemicals act as irritants upon absorption of UV light. In the occupational setting, PICD is most likely to be seen among construction or railroad workers who have handled creosote or among food preparation workers who have handled lime, celery, parsnip, or figs. After skin contact with creosote, PICD may be observed immediately after exposure to light. Workers handling the dyes eosin, methylene blue or disperse blue 35 are also at risk for PICD. [Marks, p. 201-3] "Tar smarts" is a form of photoirritant dermatitis caused by coal tar pitch derived from coal, not by asphalt derived from petroleum. Workers complain of burning of the skin starting about one hour after exposure to pitch and sunlight. Erythema and blistering may ensue. Preventive measures include wearing long-sleeve shirts, gloves, and sunscreens. [Kanerva, p. 1685] The most common causes of photoirritation reactions are tar, creosote, and psoralens (furocoumarins) in certain plants. [LaDou, p. 328]

Latency/Incubation

About one hour after exposure to pitch and sunlight;

Diagnostic

Clinical

ICD-9 Code

692.70

Related Information in Haz-Map
Symptoms/Findings

Symptoms/Findings associated with this disease:

Job Tasks

High risk job tasks associated with this disease:

Agents

Hazardous agents that cause the occupational disease: