Disease/Syndrome

Dermatophytosis

Category

Infection, Occupational

Acute/Chronic

Subacute

Synonyms

Zoophilic dermatophyte infections (Trichophyton verrucosum or Microsporum canis);

Biomedical References

Search PubMed

Comments

"The archetypal lesion of dermatophytosis is an annular scaling patch with a raised margin showing a variable degree of inflammation; the center is usually less inflamed than the edge." [PPID, p. 2987-8] Dermatophytoses are papulosquamous eruptions (tinea corporis, tinea manuum, tinea cruris, and tinea pedis). [Cecil, p. 2521] Workers who handle farm and pet animals are at risk for fungal skin infections (veterinarian, zookeeper, laboratory animal worker, farmer, pet shop worker). [ABX Guide: Tinea corporis] Dermatophytes are fungi that cause superficial skin, hair, and nail infections. They are of three types: zoophilic, anthropophilic, and geophilic based on their source from animals, humans, or soil, respectively. The most common zoophilic dermatophytes in temperate countries are Trichophyton verrucosum, the cause of cattle ringworm, and Microsporum canis, which infects dogs and cats. Also associated with dermatophytoses are pigs, rodents, horses, hedgehogs, bank voles, and monkeys. Most human dermatophytoses are anthropophilic. [PPID, p. 2985-6] Tinea infections are increased in severity, but not in frequency, in HIV infected patients. [ID, p. 1018] See "Tinea capitis," "Tinea corporis, cruris, and pedis," "Tinea versicolor," and "Onychomycosis."

Latency/Incubation

4-14 days (scalp and body)

Diagnostic

KOH prep; Culture

ICD-9 Code

110

Effective Antimicrobics

Yes

Related Information in Haz-Map
Symptoms/Findings

Symptoms/Findings associated with this disease:

Job Tasks

High risk job tasks associated with this disease:

Agents

Hazardous agents that cause the occupational disease: