Disease/Syndrome

Chromomycosis

Category

Infection, Occupational

Acute/Chronic

Chronic

Synonyms

Chromoblastomycosis; Dermatitis verrucosa;

Biomedical References

Search PubMed

Comments

INITIAL SYMPTOMS: Painless papule or nodule, usually on the lower extremities; Satellite nodules may appear; Usually grows 1-2 mm per year and may become pruritic; [Cohen, Ch. 179] This chronic fungal infection of the skin usually appears on the lower extremities after a minor puncture wound. Growing slowly for months and years, the lesions become large wart-like masses. [CCDM, p. 115] The five type of lesions described are nodular, tumorous, verrucous, plaque, and cicatricial. Secondary lesions may be spread by scratching or, rarely, by dissemination through lymphatic vessels. [ID, p. 2260] The most common fungal agents are Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Cladophialophora carrionii, and Phialophora verrucosa. Barefooted, outdoor laborers are commonly affected. The lesion progresses from a papule, to a red or purplish plaque, to a scaly or verrucous plaque, and finally to a verrucous nodule. [Guerrant, p. 569-70] Ulceration is generally limited to cases with secondary bacterial infection. [PPID, p. 2926] Both chromoblastomycosis and phaeohyphomycosis are pigmented fungi. Chromoblastomycosis is a cutaneous infection. Extracutaneous infections (subcutaneous, sinuses, the brain, and other tissues) are termed phaeohyphomycosis. [Merck Manual, p. 1334] Rarely, chromoblastomycosis occurs as meningitis. [Cohen, p. 217] See "Phaeohyphomycosis."

Latency/Incubation

Months

Diagnostic

Microscopic exam of KOH prep or stained biopsy specimen (pathognomonic muriform cells, called "copper penny"); Culture;

ICD-9 Code

117.2

Effective Antimicrobics

Yes

Image

DermNet NZ - Chromoblastomycosis

Related Information in Haz-Map
Symptoms/Findings

Symptoms/Findings associated with this disease:

Job Tasks

High risk job tasks associated with this disease:

Agents

Hazardous agents that cause the occupational disease: