Agent Name

Dimethyl acetamide

Alternative Name

N,N-Dimethylacetamide

CAS Number

127-19-5

Formula

C4-H9-N-O

Major Category

Solvents

Synonyms

Acetamide, N,N-dimethyl-; Acetdimethylamide; Acetic acid, dimethylamide; Acetyldimethylamine; CBC 510337; DMA; DMAc; Dimethylacetamide; Dimethylacetone amide; Dimethylamid kyseliny octove [Czech]; Dimethylamide acetate; N,N-Dimethylacetamide; N,N-Dimethylethanamide; SK 7176; U-5954; [ChemIDplus] UN1993

Category

Amides (<C10)

Description

Colorless liquid with a weak, ammonia- or fish-like odor; [NIOSH]

Sources/Uses

Used as a solvent for many different purposes (paint stripping, extraction, spectroscopy, crystallization, but mainly to make synthetic organic fibers); [ACGIH] Used as a solvent in plastics, resins, and gums; Also used as a catalyst and paint remover; [Hawley] Used in synthetic fiber and resin industries; Used as a solvent in elastane fiber factories; [Reference #1]

Comments

Toxic hepatitis has been reported in workers after inhalation and dermal exposure. DMA is embryotoxic when administered at high doses to female rats by dermal or oral routes. [ACGIH] A skin and eye irritant; Inhalation of high concentrations may cause liver and CNS effects; [ICSC] In a study of 440 new elastone fiber workers, 28 cases with elevated liver enzymes were detected in a 31 month period from 2002 to 2004. Using the BEI of 30 mg/g creatinine as a cutoff, the incidence of hepatic injury was about 7 times greater in the high exposure group. [Reference #1]

Reference Link

Incidence of dimethylacetamide induced hepatic inj...[Occup Environ Med. 2006] - PubMed Result

Exposure Assessment
BEI

M-Methylacetamide in urine = 30 mg/g creatinine; end of shift at end of workweek;

Skin Designation (ACGIH)

Yes

TLV (ACGIH)

10 ppm

PEL (OSHA)

10 ppm

MAK

10 ppm

IDLH (NIOSH)

300 ppm

Excerpts from Documentation for IDLHs

The chosen IDLH is based on the statement by Deichmann and Gerarde [1969] that acute inhalation at 406 and 575 ppm causes some deaths and degeneration of the liver in several species of laboratory animals. Although no time period is specified for that exposure, the chosen IDLH is probably reasonable, and perhaps even conservative, because Patty [1963] reported that liver injury was noted only in some rats and dogs exposed to repeated inhalation at 100 to 200 ppm [Horn].

Vapor Pressure

2 mm Hg

Odor Threshold Low

21 ppm

Odor Threshold High

47 ppm

Lethal Concentration

LC50 (rat) = 2,475 ppm/1H

Explanatory Notes

Odor threshold from "Quick Guide: The Electronic NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards"; Flash point = 70 deg C; See "2017 Notice of Intended Changes." [TLVs and BEIs]

Flammability (NFPA)

2: High ambient temperature required

Adverse Effects
Neurotoxin

CNS Solvent Syndrome

Hepatotoxin

Hepatotoxin, Primary

Reproductive Toxin

Yes

ACGIH Carcinogen

Not Classifiable

Links to Other NLM Databases
Health Studies

Human Health Effects from Hazardous Substances Data Bank:

Toxicity Information

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Chemical Information

Search ChemIDplus

Biomedical References

Search PubMed

Related Information in HazMap
Diseases

Occupational diseases associated with exposure to this agent:

Processes

Industrial Processes with risk of exposure: