Agent Name

Hexachloronaphthalene

CAS Number

1335-87-1

Formula

C10-H2-Cl6

Major Category

Other Classes

Synonyms

Halowax 1014; [NIOSH]

Category

Halowaxes

Description

White to light-yellow solid with an aromatic odor; [NIOSH]

Sources/Uses

Used as additives to lubricants and cable insulation (fire retardants); [ACGIH]

Comments

Chlorinated naphthalenes may be absorbed through the skin. They cause fatal liver injury in animals in subchronic inhalation studies. Penta- and hexachloronaphthalene may cause in exposed workers acne-like lesions that itch severely. Tri-, tetra-, and octachloronaphthalene are non-acnegenic under the conditions of industrial use. Nine occupational fatalities from chlorinated naphthalene poisoning have been reported. Most cases of intoxication among cable workers, assemblers, and laborers involve either penta- or hexachloronaphthalene. A nonfatal case of toxic hepatitis was reported in an 18 year old female who was soldering electrical condensers. [ACGIH] Acne-form dermatitis is listed as an adverse effect for all of the halowaxes except trichloronaphthalene in the NIOSH Pocket Guide.

Reference Link

CHLORINATED NAPHTHALENES (CICAD 34, 2001)

Exposure Assessment
Skin Designation (ACGIH)

Yes

Bioaccumulates

Yes

TLV (ACGIH)

0.2 mg/m3

PEL (OSHA)

0.2 mg/m3

IDLH (NIOSH)

2 mg/m3

Excerpts from Documentation for IDLHs

Animal data: Repeated exposure of rats to 8.9 mg/m3 of a mixture of hexachloronaphthalene and pentachloronaphthalene for up to 4.5 months produced jaundice and was fatal; minor liver injury still occurred at 1.16 mg/m3 [Drinker et al. 1937]. Hexachloronaphthalene has been shown to be more toxic than pentachloronaphthalene in ingestion studies with calves [Bell 1958]. Total doses of hexachloronaphthalene ranging from 5 to 23 mg/kg were given orally in mineral oil over 10 days and lacrimation, salivation, nasal discharge, depression, and anorexia occurred by the 5th day [Bell 1958]. Human data: It has been reported that fatal cases of hepatic injury have occurred from chronic exposures in a plant where air concentrations of mixed pentachloronaphthalenes and hexachloronaphthalenes ranged from 1 to 2 mg/m3 [Elkins 1959].

Vapor Pressure

3.3E-6 mm Hg

Adverse Effects
Hepatotoxin

Hepatotoxin, Primary

Dermatotoxin

Chloracne

Links to Other NLM Databases
Health Studies

Human Health Effects from Hazardous Substances Data Bank:

Toxicity Information

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Chemical Information

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Related Information in HazMap
Diseases

Occupational diseases associated with exposure to this agent: